Search site

Centre for Integrated Energy Research

Renewables, Alternative Fuels and Energy, Fuels and Materials from Waste

The Centre draws on technology, economic and policy related expertise across a range of renewables, alternative fuels and energy (fuels and materials) from waste: including biomass (both conventional and algal), wind, solar, technologies for the hydrogen economy and fuel cells, and future aviation and surface transport fuels. One of our major aims, under this theme, is to deliver research to support the UK to meet its renewable energy targets (data source: DECC):

  • 15% of energy consumed in the UK to come from renewable sources by 2020, as specified in the EU’s 2009 Renewable Energy Directive, versus 5% in 2013
  • 30% or more of total electrical UK energy, i.e. central plus distributed generation, to come from renewable sources (suggested by the Committee on Climate Change in 2010) versus 15% in 2013

For further details please contact Professor Paul Williams (p.t.williams@leeds.ac.uk) or Professor Alison Tomlin (a.s.tomlin@leeds.ac.uk).

Wind Resource Assessment Tools; CIER Lead - Professor Alison Tomlin (School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, a.s.tomlin@leeds.ac.uk); Sponsor - various EPSRC activities.

The annual carbon savings achievable from the effective utilisation of small-scale wind power in the UK have been estimated by the Carbon Trust to be as high as 17.8 Mt CO2, although with large uncertainties. Localised electricity generation can also help to reduce transmission losses when compared to centralised electricity production.

A key input to effective strategies for small-scale wind utilisation is the accurate prediction of available wind resource and subsequently the power which can be generated from available turbines at proposed sites.

Wind farm

A key input to effective strategies for small-scale wind utilisation is the accurate prediction of available wind resource and subsequently the power which can be generated from available turbines at proposed sites. In urban regions this is notoriously difficult due to the complex frictional properties of cities, and this has been a barrier to the effective implementation of small-scale wind. To improve the understanding of this resource, high resolution maps of mean wind speed as a function of height are being produced for a variety of UK cities using detailed building data and a new mathematical modelling approach. This is being coupled with the development of data led approaches, where cost effective short term measurements are correlated with long term reference data in order to predict long term power generation potential. The tools will inform strategies for effective siting of small-scale turbines within urban and rural regions.